Blog

Dental Veneers Help To Improve Your Smile and Boost Self Confidence

These days a nice, bright white smile means so much to everyone. It gives you more self confidence and improves your ability to relate to friends and family.  It affects your self esteem while allowing you to handle job interviews and communicate with clients.

There is nothing better than waking up to a new day with a mouth full of well proportioned white teeth. If you are not fortunate enough to be endowed with this life enhancing attribute there are ways your dentist can help you. The commonest cosmetic solution to discoloured, crooked or misaligned teeth is using dental veneers to restore your smile.

What are dental veneers?

Dental veneers are sometimes called porcelain veneers. They are slim shells which are customised to fit onto the front surface of a tooth to hide any visible imperfections. They can be fitted onto any number of teeth. There are two types of materials available but generally preference is given to porcelain veneers. They don’t stain, but maintain their colour well.

Dental veneers do a good job at

  • fixing discoloured teeth;
  • extending the size of teeth that have become worn;
  • fixing chips in teeth by concealing them;
  • concealing oversized gaps between teeth.

How to get a dental veneer fitted to improve your smile

You know your own smile and how you would like it improved, but your dentist can offer you advice too. So arrange a dental appointment to discuss your smile and how you would like to improve it.

Once you have reached a decision your dentist can start preparing your teeth to receive the veneers. In the first appointment your dentist will by removing a small amount of enamel off the teeth to be treated. This is so the new veneer will not protrude outwards and out of line with adjacent teeth. Your dentist will then make an impression of each tooth that is to receive a veneer. These models are sent on to a dental lab so that the veneers can be custom made. This will take a week or two to complete but in the meantime your dentist will fit temporary veneers.

Fitting your dental veneers

Your dentist at this stage is very careful and will put the dental veneer into place and adjustments will be made so it fits perfectly. This could involve a bit of final shaping and trimming. Once the veneers are ready to fix permanently your dentist will both thoroughly clean and etch the recipient teeth. This better prepares the surface for stronger bonding.

There are two processes to ensure a strong bond between the bond and the tooth. Firstly a high quality bonding cement is placed on the tooth and the veneer is fitted firmly on top of this material. Your dentist will use a special light which will be focussed onto the veneer, activating the cement’s chemicals enabling it to harden and bond better. Once all the veneers have been fitted your bite will be checked to make sure your teeth evenly join together when you bite or smile.

Your dentist may ask you to return after two weeks or so in order to make sure the new veneer(s) is fulfilling the function it has been fitted to do and that is to add a nice, straight and white smile.

 

It Is Possible To Relax In Your Dentist’s Chair

Even though most of the time a dentist’s visit normally ends with a check-up and a teeth clean, most people like to push the appointment back as long as possible. This is mainly because there is this inner feeling that all dentists’ appointments are going to end up a painful experience. Fortunately, that’s not the case at all and there are many ways that your dentist will ensure you don’t feel any anxiety whatever dental treatment you are receiving.

Sedation comes in many forms

Sedation is the main method used to ensure your dental experience is both anxiety and pain free. It is possible to use it for less invasive treatments like teeth cleaning and for more invasive procedures like tooth extractions and fillings. What sort of method is used depends on how severe your fear is.

Sedation dentistry makes use of medication which helps a patient relax throughout the duration of the treatment.

There are several levels of sedation as follows:

  • minimal sedation, which keeps you awake but you feel relaxed;
  • moderate sedation, which will result in you slurring your words and you won’t be able to recall much about the event;
  • deep sedation, which takes you to the brink of consciousness but it is easy for you to fully awaken;
  • general anaesthesia causes you to lose consciousness completely.

The types of sedation techniques used for dentistry

Minimal inhaling sedation is when you breathe in nitrous oxide, which is sometimes called “laughing gas”. It is combined using a mask with oxygen that’s positioned over your nose and it’s the gas that is the source of the relaxation. Your dentist will control how much of the product you will receive and once it’s switched off, the effect wears off quite quickly so you can drive yourself home afterwards.

Oral sedation has a range of effects too, starting at the minimal effect where you are given a pill to take one hour before treatment commences. This is typically Halcion, a member of the of the Valium family of drugs. This pill won’t put you to sleep but you will feel a little drowsy. A bigger dose has the same effects as moderate sedation. This form of anaesthesia is most usually associated to sedation dentistry.

IV moderate sedation isn’t a pill but is a sedative fed into a vein which works more quickly.

Deeper sedation with general anaesthesia is a medication which will make you almost unconscious or completely unconscious. While under general anaesthesia, you can’t be awakened easily until wearing off of the medication has taken place.

Sedation is basically designed to relax you and enables your dentist to get on with treatment uninterrupted. However, depending on the likely level of pain your dentist will still use a numbing product which will be placed on the area where the treatment is to take place.

Starting sedation for the first time

It’s important you discuss sedation options with your dentist first to make sure that you are a suitable candidate. You should be given a form that tells you about any risks associated with sedation treatment.

 

Does Baby Bottle Use Cause Tooth Decay?

You may think you don’t need to worry about your baby’s first teeth as adult teeth will sooner or later replace them. This isn’t the case as care for baby teeth are as important as adult teeth and baby teeth can be subject to painful tooth decay in the same way as adult teeth.  Children need healthy, strong teeth in order to chew food, as well as learn to speak and smile. If a child loses his or her baby teeth naturally to allow room for adult teeth, these teeth are more likely to grow into place successfully. When a child’s baby teeth are lost due to decay this has been called baby bottle tooth decay.

The causes of tooth decay from a baby’s bottle

This decay most commonly takes place in the front upper teeth but this doesn’t mean other teeth are not affected. Research has indicated that it is caused by a parent exposing their baby to soft drinks that are loaded with sugar. This product is put into a baby bottle and given to him or her when showing signs of restlessness and therefore may become hard to handle. Putting a baby into its cot with a bottle containing sweetened drinks is common practice too and contributes to tooth decay in a baby’s first teeth. Sugary drinks find their way into any small gaps in the teeth and are food for the ever present bacteria that causes tooth decay. Surface cleaning of the teeth can’t always remove this harmful product.

Bacteria can be passed from mother to baby

When a baby’s mother cleans a baby’s pacifier or bottle entry point using her mouth or puts the baby’s spoon into her mouth, even if it’s just to check the temperature or taste of the food, any bacteria in the mother’s mouth can be transferred to the baby and start the tooth decay cycle.

Ways to prevent tooth decay from a baby’s bottle

Fortunately decay in a baby’s first teeth can be prevented. One of the first things a mother should do is not to share her saliva with her baby. This means through the use of bottles, spoons and pacifiers. After feeding it’s suggested that the baby’s gums are wiped with a clean cloth. Up to age 3 years your baby’s first teeth should be brushed carefully with a small amount of toothpaste containing fluoride which is the size of a rice grain only. From ages of 3 to 6 years this should be increased to a pea size. The child should be supervised until you are sure the toothpaste isn’t going to be swallowed.

Other suggestions include:

  • Placing only formula, ordinary cow’s milk or just breast milk in the baby’s bottle
  • Avoid using juice, sugar water, or soft drinks in a baby’s bottle
  • No bottles should be given to children when they are in bed
  • A pacifier should never be dipped in sugar or even soaked in honey
  • A child should be using a cup for drinking by his or her 1st birthday.

As soon as your child’s 1st tooth emerges it’s time to start arranging a dental appointment. Remember the earlier you start to think and act concerning the health of your child’s teeth the better the future outcome.

How Brushing Your Teeth Can Affect Your Taste Buds in Weird Ways

How we experience what we eat or drink very much depends on our sense of taste and smell. Many foodstuffs and some drinks have a cocktail of chemicals that stimulate different smell and taste receptors. Eating or drinking different things together can seem pleasant, bland or even obnoxious. This is because of the interaction between the substances in the food or drink.

Think of peanut butter and jam, strawberries and cream, egg and steak. Each of these combinations seems to “taste” better than any of the single items by themselves.

Brushing one’s teeth is an important way to keep teeth healthy and prevent accumulation of food scraps and bacteria that can ultimately cause tooth decay. But have you ever noticed how brushing your teeth either soon before or just after eating or drinking certain things makes them taste foul? One well known example is orange juice. Something about brushing your teeth makes the taste of orange juice seem weird, but why?

It’s all about the chemistry of orange juice and toothpaste

Orange juice contains a lot more than you might think, but the two main ingredients, apart from plain water, are sugar and a weak, organic acid, citric acid. What we taste when we drink orange juice depends on two of our five types of taste buds. Our taste buds are divided up into those that can sense “acid / sour”, “sweet”, “salt”, “bitter” and “umami”. The latter is the taste that meaty foods have in them. Of these five taste buds, the “sweet” and “sour” buds are stimulated by orange juice, together with various odours, which are sensed by smell sensors in the nose.

Mix in toothpaste, which contains various substances itself, but the key ingredient that affects the flavour of orange juice is something called sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). This substance is put into toothpaste to make it frothy when you brush your teeth. Now, frothy toothpaste isn’t strictly necessary, but it does spread the paste around more easily.

SLS also affects two of the taste buds by masking the sweet bud sense and counteracting any fats that themselves mask bitter tastes. The basic result is that when orange juice and SLS are in your mouth together, the sweet taste of the juice is removed, and any latent bitter tastes are exaggerated, making the orange juice quite unpleasant.

Don’t mix orange juice with toothpaste!

The simple answer if you find one of these strange flavour distortions is to not brush your teeth so soon before or after drinking or eating the thing that then tastes weird.

Funnily enough, if you ever asked a dentist about why orange juice tastes strange when drunk after brushing your teeth, they would probably advise you not to brush your teeth right after taking orange juice anyway for a different reason. Orange juice contains two substances that are not that good for teeth. The sugar in it is definitely not good for your teeth as it attracts bacteria.

The acid in the juice actively erodes the hard enamel on the outside of your teeth. By brushing your teeth right after drinking orange juice, it tends to spread the acid component around the mouth, compounding its damaging effect on your teeth’s enamel.

For a Dental Problem Who Should You See a Dentist Or a Doctor?

The Times newspaper came up with a snippet of interesting information recently about the amount of money the NHS was spending on people choosing to make an appointment with their GP when they had a tooth ache rather than their dentist. In fact, the NHS has been spending no less than £26 million every year on people’s visits to their doctors for teeth problems. In numbers that works out to be 600,000 appointments.

It doesn’t take too much to work out the reason for this and that’s the GP doesn’t cost anything while dental appointments always attract fees, unless you’re a child, regardless of the reason why you need to go. For a dental check under the NHS it costs £19.70. Many people don’t stick to the twice annual recommendations for dental appointments but only go when they really need to, so if extreme pain inflicts them it’s just as easy to go to the doctor and not the dentist, even if you are told a dentist is the only person qualified to fix the problem.

Apart from these reasons, fear of the dentist is another reason people choose a doctor rather than a dentist. People expect to experience some level of pain when visiting a dentist which they of course want to avoid at all costs. A final reason is that many people don’t know how to differentiate between when to go to a dentist and not a doctor.

When should you visit a dentist?

If you are not sure whether to visit a dentist take a look at the list of symptoms below. They are definitely dental issues which are better treated by a dentist.

  • Toothache
  • Painful wisdom tooth
  • Abscess on the gum or tooth area
  • Tooth that’s chipped or cracked
  • Painful jaw
  • Filling has fallen out
  • Bridge or crown is loose or lost
  • Presence of mouth ulcers
  • Patches in the mouth which are red or white.

If you were involved in an accident and your teeth were damaged don’t wait to see a dentist but go to your A&E department immediately to get the necessary treatment.

Your teeth need regular attention to avoid problems

One good reason to visit your dentist apart from sorting out tooth pain is to get help with keeping your teeth in good condition. There are several options like a thorough cleaning either by the dentist or dental hygienist that are quite affordable and can help to keep your teeth in good shape in the long term.

If you don’t adopt these sorts of preventative measures, at some point in time you might need to rush down to the emergency department because you are in so much pain. A dentist’s job is to prevent pain and if you and your family attend regular dental check-ups you will see your dentist as a person who cares about your teeth and your overall health and doesn’t intend to inflict pain on you.

Energy and Sports Drinks Can Cause Irreversible Teeth Damage

When you probably think about energy and sports drinks the first thing that goes through your mind is that they are packed with calories, so you will have to work them off if you don’t want to put on weight. Unfortunately it’s not quite as simple as that, as the worst damage is being done to teeth because of the high acid levels contained in these types of drinks. If someone doesn’t flush out their mouth with good old plain water after consuming a sports or energy drink the acid starts its work on the teeth. It can at a surprisingly fast pace start to erode the enamel, which is the protective outer layer of your teeth.

Adolescents believe that sports drinks & energy drinks are better than soft drinks

It’s mostly young adults who are the main consumers of these bottles of acid, as they believe the benefits are far higher than the drawbacks. They think that their energy levels and performance playing sports ability increases the more sports drinks they consume. They also clearly believe that sports and energy drinks are nutritionally good for them.

Research shows acid damages teeth

Researchers have studied the acid levels in 9 energy drinks and 13 sports drinks. The results revealed that different drink brands and flavours didn’t necessarily come up with the same results. The acid levels were tested by immersing samples of enamel from a human tooth in the chosen drinks for 15 minutes at a time and this was followed by putting the material in a compound of artificial saliva for 2 hours. This experiment took place over 5 days and when the enamel was not being tested it was stored in a fresh batch of artificial saliva. This experiment replicates the exposure the average teenager has to these drinks every day.

The researchers revealed that enamel damage took place after just 5 days of being exposed to energy or sports drinks and energy drinks were twice as likely to do damage to the teeth as the sports variety.

Damage to the teeth’s enamel can’t be reversed

Up to 50 percent of teenagers consume energy drinks, and up to 62 percent of them drink one or more each day. If the enamel is lost it won’t replace itself naturally and the teeth not only become more sensitive but they have a higher chance of becoming decayed. Once this happens, tooth loss starts to begin an irreversible cycle.

How to avoid damage to your teeth’s enamel

It’s hard to get young people to give up anything, whether it’s bad for them or not. However, trying to keep the drinking of energy and sports drinks to a minimum may help a bit. Otherwise, the main suggestion is apart from going for regular check-ups at your dentist is rinse out the mouth with a glass of good old plain water after consuming one of these drinks or chew some gum that’s sugar free as this stimulates the production of saliva which helps to naturally rinse the mouth of anything that shouldn’t be there.

One thing you shouldn’t do is brush your teeth straight after drinking a sports or energy drink as this could spread the damaging acid onto the enamel.

What Are Wisdom Teeth and Do You Need Them?

 

Most of the useful teeth in your mouth come into full use early in your teenage years, but there are teeth that appear long after this time and may not even surface until the early twenties. These are the molars at the back of your set of teeth colloquially known as wisdom teeth. They are named as such due to their late arrival in the mouth.  You will find four in your set of teeth once they have all fully emerged. They do have a minor role to play despite their distance from the main cutting and chewing area of your teeth. So if they have pushed through nicely in the right place they can help to break food particles down into a more manageable size before the food is finally swallowed.

Not all wisdom teeth emerge normally

Because they are late arrivals in your mouth there may not be sufficient space to accommodate them as the adjacent teeth may have spread out to such an extent that they can be partially locked below the gum line or in the jaw. At this stage they are referred to as impacted wisdom teeth.

Problems from impacted wisdom teeth

  • Any wisdom teeth that aren’t in the expected position may allow particles of food to become lodged, making it difficult to remove them. In the long run, this can lead to bacteria build-up and cavity formation.
  • A wisdom tooth that isn’t in quite the right place means there is little if any space between it and the adjacent molar. This makes cleaning difficult to achieve, especially flossing, as there is little space where the thread can slide between the teeth removing any damaging food particles or plaque that has started to form between the teeth.
  • A wisdom tooth that has only partially emerged can offer bacteria a place to get into the gums where an infection could arise.
  • A wisdom tooth that has limited space to emerge may damage adjacent teeth.
  • An impacted wisdom tooth could contribute to a cyst forming near or on the impacted tooth which may damage the roots of adjacent teeth or even destroy the teeth’s supporting bone structure.

Reasons for removing a wisdom tooth

Not all wisdom teeth need to be extracted, but if there is evidence of pain that can’t be solved, an infection has developed, or there is a cyst present, extraction may be the only solution. Other reasons that may lead to your dentist reaching a decision to extract a wisdom tooth is damage it may be inflicting on adjacent teeth, the occurrence of gum disease or signs of tooth decay.

Keeping wisdom teeth in place

Wisdom teeth aren’t in a part of the mouth that gets the best attention when it comes to brushing and flossing, so if you are intent on keeping your wisdom teeth as long as possible that means being particularly vigilant at all times when it comes to flossing and brushing.  Spending longer on your own oral hygiene and ensuring you are using the right toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste will help to maintain the health of your wisdom teeth. Of course, ensuring you attend regular dental check-ups every 6 months will help your teeth too.

What You Choose to Eat Can Affect Your Teeth

Your teeth, gums and mouth are far more than simply eating and drinking tools. They’re essential for successful cutting, chewing and swallowing of food. They make up the first stages in the digestive process. Your mouth is the first point of contact so what goes in it has an impact on not only your health in general but also your gums and teeth.

To avoid negatively impacting both your teeth and your overall health you need to base your diet on your calorie requirements and making healthy dietary choices. You should select food such as:

  • portions of vegetables and fruits that cover at least half a plate at a meal;
  • whole grains are a healthy food choice and at least 50 percent of your grain intake should be whole grains like whole grain bread, brown rice and oatmeal;
  • select dairy products that are either low in fat or free of fat as often as possible;
  • If you are a meat eater choose lean meat or fish and consume other forms of protein like beans, legumes, peas, eggs and some seafood.

Diet and its relation to tooth decay

If you stick to a healthy wholesome diet you minimise damage to both your teeth and your overall health. How frequently you eat food and consume drink that is sweetened with sugar or is acidic can have a more serious impact on your teeth. Consuming snacks often between meals can be detrimental to your teeth’s overall health particularly as snacks are more commonly loaded with sugar that can do harm to teeth. This includes biscuits, cakes, crisps, sweets and chocolate. These are good for the bacteria that live in your mouth, but not for your teeth. The by product released by the bacteria is acid, which causes cavities to form and tooth decay.

Soft drinks can be harmful to teeth

A lot of people have been brought up surrounded by fizzy drinks and it’s hard to give them up. They can be harmful as constant exposure means the teeth are bathed in sugar for long periods of time which aids tooth decay.

Food that is beneficial to dental health

To keep your teeth strong and healthy they need calcium and other minerals. Milk, cheese, almonds, leafy greens, plain yogurt and tofu fortified with calcium are good products for teeth. Protein-rich lean meat, fish and eggs provide phosphorus that helps to keep your enamel intact. Vegetables and fruit, because of their high water content, help to rinse out your mouth keeping it freer of damaging bacteria.

They also encourage the production of saliva through the cutting and chewing motion required to break down the food before it’s swallowed. This helps to wash out food particles and harmful acids harmful acids. Many vegetables and fruits contain healthy amounts of vitamin C, which are good for gums and allow the quick healing of any injuries in the mouth. You can’t beat water as the best tooth-friendly drink.

If you need help choosing a teeth friendly diet ask your dentist for advice and make sure you stick to those twice yearly check-ups that will help to identify tooth related problems early.

Share Some Interesting Dental Facts With Your Kids

Bringing up discussions about teeth with your children can be far more interesting if you have some fun facts at your fingertips which can help to stimulate your child’s interest in his or her teeth. Dragging them along to the dentist kicking and screaming while making them think it’s a necessary evil with no positive outcome doesn’t fit with the modern dental experience. The dentist’s premises these days are all about that clear white smiling set of healthy teeth, not a dreary establishment where the whirr of the drill can be heard while patients come off the dentist’s chair holding a painful jaw.

8 fun dental facts to share with your children

1. Do you know what part of your body is made up of the hardest material? You might be surprised to hear and that’s your teeth’s enamel which is the hard outer surface responsible for all that cutting, chewing and masticating.
2. Here are a few facts about baby teeth. They start to develop before birth takes place while the baby is still in the womb. However, they can’t be seen until the baby is between 6 and 12 months old.
3. Do you know why it’s so important to look after your teeth? The main reason is that you only get two sets of teeth. You first set is soon replaced by your adult teeth while still a child and these are irreplaceable. They won’t grow back naturally like fingernails and toenails do. This is why you have to take care of this 2nd set of teeth as if they were made of gold.
4. I bet you didn’t know that there are different names given to the teeth in your mouth. They are canines, incisors, molars and premolars. Each of these has a specific role to play when handling your food such as cutting and tearing, grinding and chomping.
5. How do you think your teeth resemble fingerprints? There is a simple answer to that question and that is no one has identical teeth to anyone else, just like sets of fingerprints.
6. Have you ever wondered why your mouth is always wet inside? That’s because the saliva helps to add moisture to your food and while doing that it helps to remove any damaging particles that may have attached themselves to your teeth long after a meal.
7. If you have the misfortune to knock one of your teeth out maybe playing sports at school rush for a glass of milk and drop the tooth into it and hurriedly get yourself down to the dentist. You may be lucky as your dentist maybe able to place it back into its socket so that you can continue to use it.
8. Have you ever wondered why an electric toothbrush might be useful? There’s an easy answer to that question and that’s the average person who focuses on dental hygiene spends no less than thirty eight days throughout their life brushing and flossing their teeth.

Did you know there are other reasons for looking after your teeth apart from keeping them as long as possible? Recent proof has been found that not looking after your teeth can lead to a number of other unwanted health problems, including heart disease, diabetes and osteoporosis.

Now you know more about your teeth than you can ever possibly remember!
w what part of your body is made up of the hardest material? You might be surprised to hear and that’s your teeth’s enamel which is the hard outer surface responsible for all that cutting, chewing and masticating.
2. Here are a few facts about baby teeth. They start to develop before birth takes place while the baby is still in the womb. However, they can’t be seen until the baby is between 6 and 12 months old.
3. Do you know why it’s so important to look after your teeth? The main reason is that you only get two sets of teeth. You first set is soon replaced by your adult teeth while still a child and these are irreplaceable. They won’t grow back naturally like fingernails and toenails do. This is why you have to take care of this 2nd set of teeth as if they were made of gold.
4. I bet you didn’t know that there are different names given to the teeth in your mouth. They are canines, incisors, molars and premolars. Each of these has a specific role to play when handling your food such as cutting and tearing, grinding and chomping.
5. How do you think your teeth resemble fingerprints? There is a simple answer to that question and that is no one has identical teeth to anyone else, just like sets of fingerprints.
6. Have you ever wondered why your mouth is always wet inside? That’s because the saliva helps to add moisture to your food and while doing that it helps to remove any damaging particles that may have attached themselves to your teeth long after a meal.
7. If you have the misfortune to knock one of your teeth out maybe playing sports at school rush for a glass of milk and drop the tooth into it and hurriedly get yourself down to the dentist. You may be lucky as your dentist maybe able to place it back into its socket so that you can continue to use it.
8. Have you ever wondered why an electric toothbrush might be useful? There’s an easy answer to that question and that’s the average person who focuses on dental hygiene spends no less than thirty eight days throughout their life brushing and flossing their teeth.
Did you know there are other reasons for looking after your teeth apart from keeping them as long as possible? Recent proof has been found that not looking after your teeth can lead to a number of other unwanted health problems, including heart disease, diabetes and osteoporosis.
Now you know more about your teeth than you can ever possibly remember!

Stop Eating Cake to Save Your Teeth

Dentists have recently been calling out to office workers to refrain from eating cake as it is damaging teeth. A suggested substitute is a bowl of fruit and nuts which contain a fraction of the amount of sugar than do cakes.

The cake culture is not so much brought on by office workers themselves. Cake has customarily been provided by managers and supervisors as a way of rewarding workers. Leading UK dentists suggest that managers who wish to provide sweet rewards to their staff should consider offering fruit and nuts. There is nothing stopping a manager from providing the odd birthday cake but doing it almost every day is adding to both the runaway obesity epidemic as well as affecting oral health.

There are bakeries throughout Britain that specialise in selling sweet treats and they do an excellent job providing nice looking sweet delicacies that managers like to present to their workers. Over the years this has become a habit with disturbing consequences as not only do employees expect these little surprises it makes them crave these sorts of food products too. The kinds of sweet delights that end up being passed around at a tea or lunch break include doughnuts, triple chocolate biscuits and layered cakes.

What cakes and cookies do to our teeth

If you have a toothbrush available, or even a glass of water at hand, and you use these straight after eating a piece of cake or a doughnut little harm can be done to your teeth. But only the most fastidious person who is fanatical about teeth is likely to think about this important part of the anatomy and be on the ready to floss and brush after an office tea break. As a result the bacteria get busy and start to feed off any food remains left on or between your teeth.

The reason why dentists are recommending that people avoid sweetened snacks outside of normal mealtimes is because bacteria in the mouth are particularly active when sugary residues are left on the teeth for prolonged periods of time. The bacteria which lives in the sticky plaque on the surface of your teeth feeds off the sugar and as a by product produces acid, which after a remarkably short period of time eats through your teeth’s enamel and starts to create cavities. These can soon develop into tooth decay.

How to save face and say no to cakes and biscuits

Of course you can help yourself and your teeth by flatly refusing to eat sweet treats offered by your boss in between meals. You may feel left out if you do but you could also slip into your office filing cabinet or desk draw some sugar-free chewing gum which you could pop into your mouth after the cake. This helps to stir saliva into action which helps to wash away debris caught in your teeth. Later on when you have a good reason to leave the office to go to the rest room you could give your teeth a good brush and rinse with water. This should put your teeth back into the right place.

Contact Us